Sublime Frequencies Communiqué

Sublime Frequencies Communiqué

Translate

14 May 2015

ROOTS WORLD REVIEW FOR RADIO VIETNAM SF095 CD

SUBLIME FREQUENCIES COMMUNIQUÈ

SUBLIME FREQUENCIES 

 PO BOX 17971 SEATTLE WA 98127 USA



http://www.sublimefrequencies.com

https://www.facebook.com/SUBLIMEFREQUENCIES



Roots World review of SF095 CD Radio Vietnam.
Which brings us to the latest in Sublime Frequencies' confounding, mapless, aural travelogues into “the other.” Like their other radio series recordings, Radio Vietnam is a jarring stew. Here we have politically charged transistor snippets, news in English, ESL lessons, Vietnamese electric slide street guitar, lo-fi, synth drenched pop not unlike the grooves from neighboring Cambodia and Thailand, and hit-and-run hunks of ethnic minority music that somehow got caught up in the mix. The track titles, as usual, only enhance the confounding collage. “Morning Exercise in the Coded Ether,” for example, starts with digital beats, but switches abruptly to what sounds like a Martian pronouncing doom over a zither and feedback, only to be interrupted by a young Vietnamese woman speaking about something made esoteric by its lack of context before some of the most gorgeous electric guitar balladry ever copped from radio appears. This then is interrupted again by water chimes, incantations, socialist radio and perhaps what truly is an exercise regimen. And all of this takes about five minutes.
To go through this track by track seems as futile as trying to alleviate US poverty while Republicans have control of government. On and on this collection goes, perhaps useless to Vietnamese in country, but likely a joy to the few expats to hear it. But for the audience this is no doubt aimed at, it's another blunt missive fired at an already media-saturated west from a label whose early novelty has long been replaced by some seriously profound collections. Whether or not this CD-only release finds itself amongst them doesn't really matter. Oh, and Woody Guthrie even appears for a millisecond. 
- Bruce Miller

THE ATTIC REVIEW FOR BABA COMMANDANT & THE MANDINGO BAND: JUGUYA

SUBLIME FREQUENCIES COMMUNIQUÈ

SUBLIME FREQUENCIES 

 PO BOX 17971 SEATTLE WA 98127 USA



http://www.sublimefrequencies.com

https://www.facebook.com/SUBLIMEFREQUENCIES





Burkinabé traditional music has continued to flourish and musical output remains quite diverse. In spite of this influx of popular styles, a few original talents have emerged, such as Koudbi Koala's Saaba, who perform traditional Mossi music from the region around Ouagadougou, the nation's capital. Popular traditional groups from Burkina Faso include balafon bands, percussion ensembles and others such as Farafina and Gabin Dabiré, who use elements of traditional Burkinabé music.

Burkinabé music tradition is rich and loaded, but how does it sound nowadays? It seems that the awe-inspiring people from Sublime Frequencies have managed to place this quest in a professional environment, resulting a great album of contemporary Afrobeat delivered by Burkibabé based musician Baba Commandant and his Mandingo Band. On his real name Mamadou Sanou, Baba is an original and eccentric character, well respected in the Burkinabé musical community.

After joining the Koule Dafourou troupe as a dancer, baba embarked later on his current musical direction as a singer, first in Dounia and then in the Afromandingo Band. Baba Commandant plays the ngoni, a stringed instrument that is an ancestor of the banjo, also the instrument of the Donso (the traditional hunters in this region of Burkina Faso and Mali). Members Simon Chenet and Issouf Diabaté are both on guitar solo duties, with Frenchman Chenet assigning an electric trance with his solos and Diabaté adding even more metal feel. 

Juguya is an eight tracks package, conveying essential rhythms, soulful, gritty, funky vibes and combining in a distinctive mode the heritage from Fela Kuti and Africa ‘70s, Moussa Doumbia (the James Brown of Mali) together with American rock and funk genres. This is modern DIY Afrobeat sound with the ngoni. 

Party mood activated! Don’t miss this.

Original review link here: 

18 April 2015

STILL-SINGLE REVIEW FOR THAI POP SPECTACULAR: VARIOUS ARTISTS 2xLP — EXCLUSIVE RECORD STORE DAY RELEASE OUT TODAY APRIL 18th!

SUBLIME FREQUENCIES COMMUNIQUÈ

SUBLIME FREQUENCIES 

 PO BOX 17971 SEATTLE WA 98127 USA



http://www.sublimefrequencies.com

https://www.facebook.com/SUBLIMEFREQUENCIES


STILL-SINGLE REVIEW FOR THAI POP 
SPECTACULAR: VARIOUS ARTISTS 2xLP

EXCLUSIVE 
RECORD STORE DAY RELEASE 
APRIL 18th!



Various Artists – Thai Pop Spectacular 2xLP
RECOMMENDED Thai Pop Spectacular collects 21 tracks of Southeast Asian pop nuttiness that was first released sometime in the 60s, 70s, or 80s, and pulled together by Alan Bishop and Mark Gergis in 2007. The CD has been sold out for years, but Record Store Day 2015 is as good a moment as any to reissue it on vinyl. As is often the case with Sublime Frequencies vinyl, the packaging (a gatefold with notes and a few head-scratch-inducing photos) is fabulous, and the pressing pretty decent too. The music ranges from dusk-of-psychedelia twang to passably deep funk to straight-up disco, and almost none of the vocals are in English; this music was intended for the home market, not tourists. The singing tends towards extravagant nasality, and if the translated song titles are to be believed, this is pretty nutty stuff. But Google Translate didn’t corroborate any of the translated titles, so it is possible that “Papaya Salad Merchant” and “Look Whose Underwear Is Showing” are really about something more prosaic. But for the non-Thai speakers out there, what does it matter? (http://www.sublimefrequencies.com)
(Bill Meyer)

** SPECTRUM CULTURE REVIEW FOR JUGUYA **

SUBLIME FREQUENCIES COMMUNIQUÈ

SUBLIME FREQUENCIES 

 PO BOX 17971 SEATTLE WA 98127 USA



http://www.sublimefrequencies.com

https://www.facebook.com/SUBLIMEFREQUENCIES


Baba Commandant 

& the Mandingo Band: Juguya

4 / 5


The names themselves are exotic: Ouagadougou, the Burkina Faso capital with a thriving underground music scene; the ngoni, a stringed instrument that is an ancestor of the banjo; “Ntijiguimorola,” a song as funky as its title. The Sublime Frequencies label releases music from faraway places with faraway names, and that faraway mood is a big part of the label’s draw. But one of the label’s most recent releases does not offer their usual field recordings with birds competing for sound space or vintage pop records recorded under compromised circumstances and pressed on bad vinyl. Juguya, the new album by Baba Commandant and the Mandingo Band, is a professional studio recording with strong production values that blend traditional Mandingue music and electric instruments for an intensely funky Afrobeat sound.
Commandant was born Sanou Mamadou in Bobo-Dioulasso, which, after the capital, is the second largest city in Burkina Faso. Mamadou’s stage name suits a commanding musical leader, and his booming voice dominates the album, his dreads and menacing look a compelling visual signature for the music. But is he a figurehead? In a promotional video for the funky title track “Juguya,” you see Mamadou performing the long-necked, six-string ngoni, which adds a delicate texture to the solid rhythm section. Yet the music is dominated by another sound, its grooves breaking out not just with voices but with electric guitar. Simon Chenet and Issouf Diabaté split guitar solo duties on the album’s eight tracks. Frenchman Chenet achieves an electric trance with his solos, while the Burkinabé Diabaté is the more metal of the two. Yes, metal. This smoldering blend of traditional and modern African music sounds a lot like Fela Kuti cranking it up to 11.
“Tilé” opens the album with a funky guitar line before horns and call-and response chants come in over the simmering groove. This is a more condensed Afrobeat than Fela’s, topping out at six minutes instead of Fela’s typical half-hour pulse. I can only imagine how these songs expand in concert, developing into deep trances and even more incantatory solos.
Diabaté pushes “Folon” along with sludgy metal riffs, while the amps get turned down for “Siguisso,” which is the album’s most traditional-sounding track. Still, Mamadou’s booming voice makes it an intense piece. “Wasso” breaks out into a blistering guitar solo from Chenet, its rhythms shifting from sheets of sound to sharp, echoing wails and dropping out into an even more heavily reverbed drum and bass section that comes off like Afrobeat dub.
Juguya is a well-paced groove album, its rhythms based in Afrobeat but taking survey of American rock and funk genres and laying electric waste to them. The music is made of raw materials carefully mixed for sonic effect, like the rippling guitar figure that comes and goes on “Wasso.” French producer Camille Louvel, a champion of hip-hop and other musicians in Burkina Faso, worked on this album’s rich, modern mix with Colin Thevenin and Sublime Frequencies co-founder Hisham Mayet. The production elevates their dense sound without making it slick. If you ever wondered what the music of Konono No. 1 and other Congotronics artists might sound without the lo-fi trappings, get this album.


13 April 2015

RECORD STORE DAY RELEASE! THAI POP SPECTACULAR 2LP 1st time on vinyl!

SUBLIME FREQUENCIES COMMUNIQUÈ

SUBLIME FREQUENCIES 

 PO BOX 17971 SEATTLE WA 98127 USA



http://www.sublimefrequencies.com

https://www.facebook.com/SUBLIMEFREQUENCIES


RECORD STORE DAY RELEASE!

THAI POP SPECTACULAR 2LP



1st time on vinyl
Double LP gate-fold heavyweight Stoughton jacket, limited to 1000 copies

SUPPORT YOUR LOCAL STORE on RSD. April 18th, 2015


"...The artists featured on Thai Pop Spectacular range from modest players of their time to major stars. The collection includes one of the earliest tracks from Pumpuang Duangjan (dubbed "the queen of luk thung"), who brought that style into popular music to stay. Also featured is the "shadow music" string sounds of Johnny Guitar, legendary comedian Sangthong Seesai, two classic tracks from Thai films, blazing examples of Bangkok disco from the 1970s, and the most outrageous version of "The Night Chicago Died" you'll ever encounter. Thick horn sections, wah-wah guitars, tight drums, and funky organs round out this superb collection, which proves beyond a doubt that the Thai were a completely unique and powerful force during the global popular music explosion of the 1960s, '70s, '80s. Gorgeous double-LP heavy gatefold vinyl release of the long out-of-print CD originally compiled by Alan Bishop and Mark Gergis in 2007.


24 March 2015

Songlines Magazine #107, April/May, 2015: 4 Star Review for Vodoun Gods on the Slave Coast dvd

SUBLIME FREQUENCIES COMMUNIQUÈ

SUBLIME FREQUENCIES 

 PO BOX 17971 SEATTLE WA 98127 USA



http://www.sublimefrequencies.com

https://www.facebook.com/SUBLIMEFREQUENCIES


A 4 star review of Hisham Mayet's film Vodoun Gods on the Slave Coast on SUBLIME FREQUENCIES, written by Nigel Williamson in Songlines Magazine #107, April/May, 2015.
A quote:
"A visual field recording of Benin's voodoo culture"

Sublime Frequencies is distributed in the Benelux by Xango Music, and available at www.xangomusic.com 




23 March 2015

Djolo Cultures d' Afrique Review For Baba Commandant

SUBLIME FREQUENCIES COMMUNIQUÈ

SUBLIME FREQUENCIES 

 PO BOX 17971 SEATTLE WA 98127 USA



http://www.sublimefrequencies.com

https://www.facebook.com/SUBLIMEFREQUENCIES





Baba Commandant, le punk noir du Burkina Faso


Je me souviens une fois avoir lu une critique reprochant l’ambiance « pirate » et la dangerosité d’un petit maquis à Bamako, dans un guide touristique (à bien y penser et vu l’impertinence du commentaire ça devait être le guide du routard) ; et bien l’écoute de cet album de Baba Commandant m’a rappelé l’ambiance « pirate » de ce bar, un petit endroit sombre, ou l’on peut boire une bière Castel mal déglacée, en écoutant le son d’une guitare distordue crachée par un vieil ampli grésillant.
C’est dans ce décor, avec son kamélé n’goni à la main (instrument à cordes, proche de la kora, typique du Mali et du Burkina Faso) et son look de punk dozo (confréries de chasseur anciennes) un peu barré, que le burkinabéBaba Commandant, vient livrer son nouvel album Juguya ; d’ailleurs à le voir, on pourrait penser qu’il s’agit d’un de ces éternels mauvais musiciens qui tenterait vaguement de se raccrocher à un semblant de patrimoine culturel…. grosse erreur !!
Baba Commandant fait exploser le patrimoine culturel de son pays, comme aucun musicien burkinabé avant lui, ou presque. Et si l’on retrouve les sonorités traditionnelles mandingues, l’artiste originaire de Bobo Dioulasso (ville à la frontière malienne), n’hésite pas à aller emprunter du côté de l’afrobeat (avec des sections cuivres remarquables, assurées par son groupe le Mandinguo Band), mais aussi du rock, du punk, du hip-hop, et même du dub.
L’image de punk du Baba Commandant, Mamadou Sanou de son vrai nom, n’est pas née aujourd’hui ; il faut dire qu’il n’est pas un de ces jeunes premiers pris au berceau sous l’aile d’une maison de disque international, son parcours artistique a débuté en 81 comme danseur, puis petit à petit, au rythme des cabarets et des balani, et au côté de grand nom de la musique ouest-africaine (notamment le burkinabé Victor Démé), Commandant Baba s’est forgé une solide réputation. Aujourd’hui, son album Juguya, paru sur l’excellent label Sublime Frequencies, lui apporte une visibilité, et une reconnaissance internationale.
Sur Juguya, vous retrouverez 8 titres, où se s’entremêlent avec harmonie, les notes cristallines des kora et ngoni, l’énergie brute des guitares saturées, la transe des rythmes de balafon, et bien sûr le chant âpre et puissant de Baba Commandant.
Si vous avez apprécié le contenu de cet article sur Baba Commandant, n’hésitez pas à visiter notre page facebook et a y réagir, et pourquoi pas même nous encourager d’une petite mention « j’aime ».

22 March 2015

Radio Vietnam CD: Dusty Groove Review

SUBLIME FREQUENCIES COMMUNIQUÈ

SUBLIME FREQUENCIES 

 PO BOX 17971 SEATTLE WA 98127 USA



http://www.sublimefrequencies.com

https://www.facebook.com/SUBLIMEFREQUENCIES


Original link at:

Radio Vietnam CD SF095 





A very cool set that returns to the earliest style of the Sublime Frequencies label – those 90s releases that often had the company grabbing global sounds out of the ether, then committing them to tape! The set here is exactly what's promised by the title – music from the radio in Vietnam – put together at a level that's extremely thoughtful and a lot more compelling than just flipping the dial in Southeast Asia! Each track is kind of a different pastiche of songs and spoken bits – assembled in a way that creates a certain flavor, and really makes a new sort of music out of these invisible sounds from the air. Titles include "Home Village Identity Event", "Induction Temperature", "Hit Zones", "Morning Exercise In The Coded Ether", "Message To The Age Of Twenty", and "America Lost The Vietnam War". © 1996-2015, Dusty Groove, Inc.


13 March 2015

BOMB Magazine — Artists in Conversation: Olivia Wyatt by Will Oldham

SUBLIME FREQUENCIES COMMUNIQUÈ

SUBLIME FREQUENCIES 

 PO BOX 17971 SEATTLE WA 98127 USA



http://www.sublimefrequencies.com

https://www.facebook.com/SUBLIMEFREQUENCIES


Olivia Wyatt

by Will Oldham


Sea-gypsies, Vodou, and ethnographic documentary.



Still from Sailing a Sinking Sea, 2015. Directed by Olivia Wyatt. Image courtesy of the artist.

06 March 2015

Review in Pasatiempo: Santa Fe, New Mexico's Weekly Magazine VARIOUS ARTISTS "Folk Music of the Sahel 1: Niger" (Sublime Frequencies)

SUBLIME FREQUENCIES COMMUNIQUÈ

SUBLIME FREQUENCIES 

 PO BOX 17971 SEATTLE WA 98127 USA



http://www.sublimefrequencies.com

https://www.facebook.com/SUBLIMEFREQUENCIES


Review in Pasatiempo: Santa Fe, New Mexico's Weekly Magazine
VARIOUS ARTISTS "Folk Music of the Sahel 1: Niger" 

(Sublime Frequencies)

With his world-music label Sublime Frequencies, Hisham Mayet has become something of a cross between Alan Lomax and Anthony Bourdain, traveling to war-torn landscapes to record popular and ritual music in Africa and the Middle East. In the process, he exposes the musicians he encounters to wider audiences in Europe and North America. For the debut of his ambitious new project — a planned six-volume series surveying the musical landscape of Niger’s Sahel region, famed for its mix of nomadic animist and Afro-Islamic cultures — Mayet has released a trove of field recordings he collected over the past decade. The album includes live recordings of griots, or praise singers, whose improvised, hand-percussion-backed performances blend storytelling, gossip, and commentary on local events. An astonishing cut from Koudede, a popular Tuareg guitarist killed last year in a car accident, showcases his haunting, Arabic-infused, bluesy songs that made him a local hero. Songs to back the courtship dances of the Wodaabe tribe as well as several call-and-response choruses, syncopated to oil-can drums, round out this collection.
- Casey Sanchez


04 March 2015

DUSTY GROOVE and AQUARIUS RECORDS' REVIEWS FOR BABA COMMANDANT & THE MANDINGO BAND: JUGUYA

SUBLIME FREQUENCIES COMMUNIQUÈ

SUBLIME FREQUENCIES 

 PO BOX 17971 SEATTLE WA 98127 USA



http://www.sublimefrequencies.com

https://www.facebook.com/SUBLIMEFREQUENCIES




DUSTY GROOVE REVIEW FOR
BABA COMMANDANT & THE MANDINGO BAND: JUGUYA
One of the most solid albums we've ever heard on the Sublime Frequencies label – a studio recording by a group with a really great approach to their music – a style that mixes classic Afro Funk elements with rootsier elements on the instrumentation! The grooves are tight, but the sound has some nice earthy qualities at times – especially in Baba Commandment's use of ngoni, which rings out in a way that's both melodic and rhythmic at the same time – echoing an older mandingo tradition, but coming across with a lot of punch! Other instrumentation includes lots of percussion, fuzzy guitars, and balafon too – and most of the vocals have a call/response style, in which other singers call out alongside Baba's lead. Really great stuff – with titles that include "Tile", "Folon", "Wasso", "Juguya", "Siguisso", and "Ntijiguimorola". © 1996-2015, Dusty Groove, Inc.

AQUARIUS RECORDS' REVIEW FOR
BABA COMMANDANT & THE MANDINGO BAND: JUGUYA
Well, there's Records Of The Week, and then there's Records Of The Week. This one was quite a nice surprise. And it's not like we don't already expect great things from the globetrotting subversives at the Sublime Frequencies label, they're always making great discoveries - we almost take 'em for granted now, we suppose. So with this album, by the wonderfully-named Baba Commandant and the Mandingo Band, which boast a striking cover design too, at first we were like, that's probably going to be cool, but then when we heard it, we were like, this is REALLY cool. We were expecting some kind of funky Afrobeat, and that's what it is, but much wilder than we ever imagined. Totally off the hook! 
http://aquariusrecords.org/images/dot.gifBaba Commandant (aka Mamadou Sanou) and his band are from the West African state of Burkina Faso (formerly the Upper Volta), and in a true, underground, DIY style, mix up the traditional, tribal Mandingo music of their region with a more modern, electric approach. Baba Commandant, born in 1973, who sings and plays the ngoni (an ancient, traditional lute), has been an active and original presence on the music scene in Burkina Faso for many years. He's been in various other bands, but as far as we know, this is the debut release from this group. It's a cool discovery on the part of Sublime Frequencies, but we bet Baba Commandant & Co. would have been heard sooner or later over here, just due to the tons of rhythmic energy radiating from their music. Yup, they've got plenty of power (there's guitars to go with the ngoni, horns too, and they don't hold back), making for some pretty hot jams. The wide ranging vocals of Baba and his backup singers are crucial too, and together the group really casts a hypnotic spell. Fans of Konono No.1, of all the cool desert guitar bands that Sublime Frequencies has brought us before (like the late, great Koudede, whom Baba Commandant has performed a live tribute to), of anything Afro-funky and maybe a bit eccentric in that vein, check this out, you will dig!!
http://aquariusrecords.org/images/dot.gifOn cd and lp, and as usual with Sublime Frequencies, the vinyl is a limited edition release.


MPEG Stream: "Waso" 
MPEG Stream: "Folon" 
MPEG Stream: "Ntijiguimorola" 
MPEG Stream: "Siguisso"